Breaking Boundaries

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Imagine a team of talented people working together, developing the next generation of their flagship product. They have to design and manage a change so significant it will affect all variants of their multi-platform product, and of course, it has to be ready and launched seamlessly in perfect synchronization. It is a delicate design and engineering task, but as subtle as it is, its scope is vast. Millions of users are to be affected by it. The upcoming release is designed to introduce a major improvement to the product, but if something goes wrong, users could be left without the ability to use the service for days. What picture do you have in mind when reading this description? Can you see this team working together? How does this group effort look like? Do you see a big room, a lot of laptops on the table, a huge whiteboard with sketches, and the commotion of an ongoing brainstorming (or multiple instances of it) filling the space? Now, imagine your task is to build such a team from scratch. What do you do? If you are like most managers in most companies, you probably start to look around. You turn to local … Read More

Random Bliss

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Random Bliss When I started my way as an urban photographer, I tried to maximize the potential of each photo-walk by planning my route carefully in advance. Back in those days, I was going out with the intent to find beautiful things to capture. And the guidelines for what is considered “a beautiful thing” were fairly straightforward. It included geometrical shapes, patterns, well-thought-of structures, and symmetry (or well-designed asymmetry). There was always room for surprises, but all in all, I usually got what I was looking for. Everything else was in my blind spot. These manmade structures fascinated me because they represented total control. First by the people who created them, and then by me. Carefully planning what to capture, waiting for the right time, using the optimal settings of my camera, and looking for the perfect angle. And then one day, while looking for that perfect angle to capture a beehive-like building, I stumbled upon this broken glass tile. And I was hypnotized. It was the complete opposite of what I was set to capture. It was an anomaly, and not a designed one, but rather a purely random one. And within it, there was a universe of random … Read More

Question Stream?

Lidor WyssockyBlog

When was the last time you had a question, and you stopped to think about it or just left it hanging? Are we obsessively rushing to find answers instead of enjoying the unknown? Is the need for answers an addiction? Which leaves more room for imagination and creativity: questions or answers? How about trying to delay the satisfaction of having a response? Can we try writing down our questions and let them sink in? Might we come up with “the right answer” ourselves, without looking it up? And what’s the worse that can happen if we don’t? Can we enjoy revisiting a question which we don’t know the answer to? Is it possible to enjoy questions that no one has answers to? If you are maintaining a journal, is it full of periods and exclamation marks or full of question marks? If you start recording questions, is it possible you will come up with additional ones? Is asking questions contagious? And if it is, wouldn’t that be great? Will you take a minute to visit the seempli Wonder question stream? Does it look strange hosted on a platform with more definitive statements than questions? Will you ask more questions tomorrow? … Read More

Going Analog

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Before we start, there are a few things you should know about me: #1 I love tools and gadgets, and productivity tools are my personal favorite. Back in the pre-smartphone age, when even laptops were not a commodity, I loved yearly journals, and the more “gadgets” they had — the better. For two or three years, I used a fancy annual planner with “extensible modules” like pages in different colors, sticky notes, and so on, and it was a delight. Not the most efficient, but a delight nevertheless. As digital alternatives and obviously mobile apps became more accessible, I found “my new love.” After going through several trial and error cycles, I found the perfect digital workflow for me, which included Todoist, Evernote, and of course, Google Calendar.

Be an Inspiration

Lidor WyssockyBlog

“The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Steven Spielberg When seempli was first launched, I had a mission: to help anyone on the planet realize their creative potential. It is not a trivial mission to achieve, but four years later, I know now more than ever before that it is achievable. I know that because everywhere I look, I see people with so much potential starting realize what … Read More

From Exploration to Creation

Lidor WyssockyBlog

I love to observe. Observing, though it may sound passive, requires a lot of focus and energy. First, you need to overcome the natural tendency of your brain to gravitate toward immediate goals and toward the known and familiar. When you are walking to the office, for example, your mind is focused on getting to your destination. Everything else is, by default, less important. And then there are the modern distractions in the form of repeated notifications from our smart-devices — notifications that grant our mind immediate rewards, and gradually create a real, chemical addiction. So mindfully observing the world is far from being trivial. Exploring the world around you and seeing everything as the inspiration requires deliberate, repeated work until it becomes a habit. When seempli was launched, this was my first and immediate goal: to help people be more mindful and observant. I realized that this skill is essential if we wish to realize our creative potential. Observing the world was a lever to being more creative. And that’s why the basic seempli gameplay — the one captured in the Exploration Prism — was focused on observing and capturing what you find. As a photographer, the connection between … Read More

seempli Spots: Creative Playgrounds are Everywhere

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Today, I am excited to launch the latest addition to the seempli Platform: seempli Spots™. But instead of just telling you what seempli Spots are and how they fit into our creativity platform, please allow me to start with just how the concept for seempli Spots was conceived. Like many others, I spend a significant part of August with my family on vacation. The highlight of our vacation was a trip to London, which I hadn’t visited for far too long. If you follow Habit Zero and this blog, you already saw some of the insights from this trip. It was the best time ever, full of music, theatre, art, great food, and just wandering in the streets, exploring places, people, and unfamiliar things. For someone whose motto is “observe and explore,” these eight days were a feast of discoveries and insights. I took so many photos and notes I will need some time to process it all. Now, please don’t laugh, but with all these experiences in mind, one of the things I loved most in London was the Tube. From the iconic design of its map to its remarkable efficiency. From the variety of people you meet to … Read More

GOOD EVENING ROMFORD

Lidor WyssockyBlog

“Cover band? What do you want to be in a cover band for?” He tried to explain it dozens of times to his father. He just didn’t get it. When their van entered the empty driveway of the Brookside Theatre, he tried to explain it to himself. It was a small gig in a small town. It was more of a community center than a theatre. The hall was so small you could walk from door to stage in ten steps. 120 foldable chairs were arranged in ten rows. The ceiling was so low he could almost touch it. And the soundman came with the place. Backstage, which was more of a side-stage, he held a small mirror in his left hand, and carefully put on his makeup with the right. He heard the people starting to fill the small hall and dragging their chairs. In ten minutes his band will take the stage. When the audience is big enough, there’s energy in the air no-one can (or wants to) resist. With 120 people in a community center, you just cannot know how it will be like. These people are here because of their memories. He and his friends are … Read More

Imaginative Implementation

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Innovation is almost always associated with having new ideas. We all know that having a creative idea is just the beginning of a possibly long journey — the journey toward its successful implementation. And yet, it seems like the ideation phase of a project often gets all the fame and glory. Ideation is the cool activity where the magic happens. The rest is often treated as a necessary evil — something that has to be done and obviously requires technical skills, but which has little to do with innovation per se.

Performance Enabling

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Organizations love to measure things. Anything. Some organizations are obsessed with measurements, and for a good reason: organizations have to be managed and, as everyone knows, if you can’t measure something you can’t manage it. Or can you? Organizations are built by people. People are the most important asset an organization has. And assets… (you guessed it) have to be managed. Or more accurately: their performance has to be managed. Just like you monitor and manage the performance of your financial or real estate assets. And this is probably how the term Performance Management was coined. The next step was obvious… Soon, performance evaluation processes were routine. And with them came grading systems, tools to collect, analyze, and manage the data on your Human Capital. And while there is always some new trends, tools, or methods, the focus of many organizations remains to measure and manage the performance of their most valuable assets. Here’s the Wikipedia definition of Performance Management: Performance management (PM) includes activities which ensure that goals are consistently being met effectively and efficiently. What word do you think stands out in this definition? What caught my eye is the verb “to ensure.” Despite being associated with a … Read More