This is on us.

Lidor WyssockyBlog

The world has gone crazy. Politicians are burning down the house. Social networks amplify lies, hatred, and violence. Powerful people and organizations controlling the economy, and eventually us. And we… We mumble in disbelief, we post, we add some hashtags, and we move on with our lives. At least most of us do. Most of the time. Don’t blame the world. Don’t blame politicians. Don’t blame social networks. Don’t blame the powerful people. Blame the people who really allow this organized chaos to go on for years and decades. We should blame ourselves. Every time we see something shocking in the news and switch the channel — it’s on us. Every time we see wrongdoing, and we walk away — it’s on us. Every day we continue to work for companies that benefit from this twisted method — it’s on us. Every day we work for companies that don’t actively promote diversity and inclusion — it’s on us. Every time we post, share, and like in the same platforms that thrive when we think less, feel less, and empathize less — it’s on us. Every time we don’t go out and vote — it’s on us. Every day that passes … Read More

Creativity Workshop in a Box. Minus the Box

Lidor WyssockyBlog

This week the world celebrated Creativity and Innovation Week. Just writing the word Celebrated feels awkward in these strange times. Many (if not most) of us are facing a new reality and with it so many personal and professional challenges. With all these challenges, I believe this is a perfect time to acknowledge the importance of Creativity and the impact it can have on our lives. And I am not talking about the global scale challenges. Innovation will clearly be required to come up with a vaccine, and the global economic situation also poses serious questions that will require creative solutions. These challenges are beyond the control of most of us, but this does not mean we should just sit back and wait. Our Creativity can help us turn our personal and professional challenges into opportunities. And that is 100% in our hands. More than a month ago, when it was already clear that we are going to face quite a few restrictions on our day-to-day operation, I had to put on hold our Creative Observation Tours. At the same time, many people around the world found themselves literally confined to their homes most of the time. Some of them … Read More

Remote Creativity

Lidor WyssockyBlog

These are challenging times. For some of us, it is a matter of life and death. The rest of us are just trying to get used to a new routine, which is not even a routine because it keeps changing and, at least until now in most countries, escalating. One of the changes many of us are facing these days is the transition to remote work. Admittedly, this is not the most pressing challenge or the most significant change we face. But in the context of maintaining our professionalism and effectiveness, such a transition does require some thought. It is not just a matter of taking your laptop and connecting to your data and colleagues remotely. For teams who are used to sharing the same space and intimately working together, such a change is far from being trivial. During the past week, I came across quite a few questions on how to maintain the ability of a team to produce joint creative work while working remotely. Team members find themselves in front of their laptops, either working in isolation or waiting for a remote meeting to start. On the surface, this might seem like the essence of work, but there … Read More

Space for Opportunities

Lidor WyssockyBlog

I’m a planner. For most of my life, I was. And by that, I don’t mean I necessarily have detailed long-term plans. But when it comes to projects or my daily agenda, my instinct was always to start with a plan. Whatever the project is, there is nothing that will make me happier than a blank piece of paper or an empty table — a space to write down what and when I need to do to realize the project. Then, of course, I might add interfaces, resources, and other things that the plan depends on. And just like magic, without anything changed in the real world, I feel there’s a much higher chance the project would reach its desired goal. This might all sound reasonable enough. What you need to know about me, though, is that under the label “Project,” I can easily host practically anything. From a one-week vacation abroad to a trip to Ikea, from packing my bag before I go to a photo-walk to finding the optimal bag to buy, from building a team to defining the work-plan for the upcoming year. My default mindset in any of those is: the better the plan — the … Read More

Breaking Boundaries

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Imagine a team of talented people working together, developing the next generation of their flagship product. They have to design and manage a change so significant it will affect all variants of their multi-platform product, and of course, it has to be ready and launched seamlessly in perfect synchronization. It is a delicate design and engineering task, but as subtle as it is, its scope is vast. Millions of users are to be affected by it. The upcoming release is designed to introduce a major improvement to the product, but if something goes wrong, users could be left without the ability to use the service for days. What picture do you have in mind when reading this description? Can you see this team working together? How does this group effort look like? Do you see a big room, a lot of laptops on the table, a huge whiteboard with sketches, and the commotion of an ongoing brainstorming (or multiple instances of it) filling the space? Now, imagine your task is to build such a team from scratch. What do you do? If you are like most managers in most companies, you probably start to look around. You turn to local … Read More

Random Bliss

Lidor WyssockyBlog

When I started my way as an urban photographer, I tried to maximize the potential of each photo-walk by planning my route carefully in advance. Back in those days, I was going out with the intent to find beautiful things to capture. And the guidelines for what is considered “a beautiful thing” were fairly straightforward. It included geometrical shapes, patterns, well-thought-of structures, and symmetry (or well-designed asymmetry). There was always room for surprises, but all in all, I usually got what I was looking for. Everything else was in my blind spot. These manmade structures fascinated me because they represented total control. First by the people who created them, and then by me. Carefully planning what to capture, waiting for the right time, using the optimal settings of my camera, and looking for the perfect angle. And then one day, while looking for that perfect angle to capture a beehive-like building, I stumbled upon this broken glass tile. And I was hypnotized. It was the complete opposite of what I was set to capture. It was an anomaly, and not a designed one, but rather a purely random one. And within it, there was a universe of random details. It … Read More

Question Stream?

Lidor WyssockyBlog

When was the last time you had a question, and you stopped to think about it or just left it hanging? Are we obsessively rushing to find answers instead of enjoying the unknown? Is the need for answers an addiction? Which leaves more room for imagination and creativity: questions or answers? How about trying to delay the satisfaction of having a response? Can we try writing down our questions and let them sink in? Might we come up with “the right answer” ourselves, without looking it up? And what’s the worse that can happen if we don’t? Can we enjoy revisiting a question which we don’t know the answer to? Is it possible to enjoy questions that no one has answers to? If you are maintaining a journal, is it full of periods and exclamation marks or full of question marks? If you start recording questions, is it possible you will come up with additional ones? Is asking questions contagious? And if it is, wouldn’t that be great? Will you take a minute to visit the seempli Wonder question stream? Does it look strange hosted on a platform with more definitive statements than questions? Will you ask more questions tomorrow? … Read More

Going Analog

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Before we start, there are a few things you should know about me: #1 I love tools and gadgets, and productivity tools are my personal favorite. Back in the pre-smartphone age, when even laptops were not a commodity, I loved yearly journals, and the more “gadgets” they had — the better. For two or three years, I used a fancy annual planner with “extensible modules” like pages in different colors, sticky notes, and so on, and it was a delight. Not the most efficient, but a delight nevertheless. As digital alternatives and obviously mobile apps became more accessible, I found “my new love.” After going through several trial and error cycles, I found the perfect digital workflow for me, which included Todoist, Evernote, and of course, Google Calendar.

Be an Inspiration

Lidor WyssockyBlog

“The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Steven Spielberg When seempli was first launched, I had a mission: to help anyone on the planet realize their creative potential. It is not a trivial mission to achieve, but four years later, I know now more than ever before that it is achievable. I know that because everywhere I look, I see people with so much potential starting realize what … Read More

From Exploration to Creation

Lidor WyssockyBlog

I love to observe. Observing, though it may sound passive, requires a lot of focus and energy. First, you need to overcome the natural tendency of your brain to gravitate toward immediate goals and toward the known and familiar. When you are walking to the office, for example, your mind is focused on getting to your destination. Everything else is, by default, less important. And then there are the modern distractions in the form of repeated notifications from our smart-devices — notifications that grant our mind immediate rewards, and gradually create a real, chemical addiction. So mindfully observing the world is far from being trivial. Exploring the world around you and seeing everything as the inspiration requires deliberate, repeated work until it becomes a habit. When seempli was launched, this was my first and immediate goal: to help people be more mindful and observant. I realized that this skill is essential if we wish to realize our creative potential. Observing the world was a lever to being more creative. And that’s why the basic seempli gameplay — the one captured in the Exploration Prism — was focused on observing and capturing what you find. As a photographer, the connection between … Read More