Creativity Workshop in a Box. Minus the Box

Lidor WyssockyBlog

This week the world celebrated Creativity and Innovation Week. Just writing the word Celebrated feels awkward in these strange times. Many (if not most) of us are facing a new reality and with it so many personal and professional challenges. With all these challenges, I believe this is a perfect time to acknowledge the importance of Creativity and the impact it can have on our lives. And I am not talking about the global scale challenges. Innovation will clearly be required to come up with a vaccine, and the global economic situation also poses serious questions that will require creative solutions. These challenges are beyond the control of most of us, but this does not mean we should just sit back and wait. Our Creativity can help us turn our personal and professional challenges into opportunities. And that is 100% in our hands. More than a month ago, when it was already clear that we are going to face quite a few restrictions on our day-to-day operation, I had to put on hold our Creative Observation Tours. At the same time, many people around the world found themselves literally confined to their homes most of the time. Some of them … Read More

Remote Creativity

Lidor WyssockyBlog

These are challenging times. For some of us, it is a matter of life and death. The rest of us are just trying to get used to a new routine, which is not even a routine because it keeps changing and, at least until now in most countries, escalating. One of the changes many of us are facing these days is the transition to remote work. Admittedly, this is not the most pressing challenge or the most significant change we face. But in the context of maintaining our professionalism and effectiveness, such a transition does require some thought. It is not just a matter of taking your laptop and connecting to your data and colleagues remotely. For teams who are used to sharing the same space and intimately working together, such a change is far from being trivial. During the past week, I came across quite a few questions on how to maintain the ability of a team to produce joint creative work while working remotely. Team members find themselves in front of their laptops, either working in isolation or waiting for a remote meeting to start. On the surface, this might seem like the essence of work, but there … Read More

Breaking Boundaries

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Imagine a team of talented people working together, developing the next generation of their flagship product. They have to design and manage a change so significant it will affect all variants of their multi-platform product, and of course, it has to be ready and launched seamlessly in perfect synchronization. It is a delicate design and engineering task, but as subtle as it is, its scope is vast. Millions of users are to be affected by it. The upcoming release is designed to introduce a major improvement to the product, but if something goes wrong, users could be left without the ability to use the service for days. What picture do you have in mind when reading this description? Can you see this team working together? How does this group effort look like? Do you see a big room, a lot of laptops on the table, a huge whiteboard with sketches, and the commotion of an ongoing brainstorming (or multiple instances of it) filling the space? Now, imagine your task is to build such a team from scratch. What do you do? If you are like most managers in most companies, you probably start to look around. You turn to local … Read More

habit zero #153

Lidor WyssockyHabit Zero

one thing I observed   I planned to start earlier, but it took me more time than I had expected to find a parking space. I had to drive to a nearby parking lot, and so I started my photo walk in a different spot than the one I had planned to. Then, when I began to walk, I found myself at a dead-end — a construction site I couldn’t cross. I had to walk back five minutes and start over, trying to find a place I could pass. In short, nothing was going as planned. Twenty minutes later, in a small street, I hadn’t visited for quite some time, I found this storefront, with nothing but a curtain, and no sign suggesting what products or services it offered. But one thing caught my attention apart from the colorful curtain: a black cat sitting in front of the door. It was guarding the entrance as if it is the only one who knows what goes on inside. I slowly pointed my camera and started to approach when the cat stood up. I thought I am going to lose the opportunity for a great capture, but then it stretched in a … Read More

Random Bliss

Lidor WyssockyBlog

When I started my way as an urban photographer, I tried to maximize the potential of each photo-walk by planning my route carefully in advance. Back in those days, I was going out with the intent to find beautiful things to capture. And the guidelines for what is considered “a beautiful thing” were fairly straightforward. It included geometrical shapes, patterns, well-thought-of structures, and symmetry (or well-designed asymmetry). There was always room for surprises, but all in all, I usually got what I was looking for. Everything else was in my blind spot. These manmade structures fascinated me because they represented total control. First by the people who created them, and then by me. Carefully planning what to capture, waiting for the right time, using the optimal settings of my camera, and looking for the perfect angle. And then one day, while looking for that perfect angle to capture a beehive-like building, I stumbled upon this broken glass tile. And I was hypnotized. It was the complete opposite of what I was set to capture. It was an anomaly, and not a designed one, but rather a purely random one. And within it, there was a universe of random details. It … Read More

habit zero #151

Lidor WyssockyHabit Zero

one thing I observed   Well, more than one actually… So, here I was waiting for my bus. The road was almost empty, which is unusual for that time of day. After 20 minutes, we realized that the road is blocked and the bus will not be arriving any time soon. Opportunity. I decided to walk to the nearest train station. It was dark, and I took a route I never did before. I decided it’s a perfect chance to have an experience. During the next 30 minutes, I found things I don’t usually see. An animated horse, the moon hiding behind a composition of metal bars, and the silhouette of a flag that came alive thanks to the wind. The streets were almost empty, and I took the memories of all these treasures with me. I got to the train and felt an urge to do something new with the things I have collected. I downloaded a video editing app and started to play with the pieces of the puzzle. one thing I thought of   Capturing short videos instead of still images opened up a new world for me. Honestly, I don’t think the result is good, and … Read More

Question Stream?

Lidor WyssockyBlog

When was the last time you had a question, and you stopped to think about it or just left it hanging? Are we obsessively rushing to find answers instead of enjoying the unknown? Is the need for answers an addiction? Which leaves more room for imagination and creativity: questions or answers? How about trying to delay the satisfaction of having a response? Can we try writing down our questions and let them sink in? Might we come up with “the right answer” ourselves, without looking it up? And what’s the worse that can happen if we don’t? Can we enjoy revisiting a question which we don’t know the answer to? Is it possible to enjoy questions that no one has answers to? If you are maintaining a journal, is it full of periods and exclamation marks or full of question marks? If you start recording questions, is it possible you will come up with additional ones? Is asking questions contagious? And if it is, wouldn’t that be great? Will you take a minute to visit the seempli Wonder question stream? Does it look strange hosted on a platform with more definitive statements than questions? Will you ask more questions tomorrow? … Read More

Going Analog

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Before we start, there are a few things you should know about me: #1 I love tools and gadgets, and productivity tools are my personal favorite. Back in the pre-smartphone age, when even laptops were not a commodity, I loved yearly journals, and the more “gadgets” they had — the better. For two or three years, I used a fancy annual planner with “extensible modules” like pages in different colors, sticky notes, and so on, and it was a delight. Not the most efficient, but a delight nevertheless. As digital alternatives and obviously mobile apps became more accessible, I found “my new love.” After going through several trial and error cycles, I found the perfect digital workflow for me, which included Todoist, Evernote, and of course, Google Calendar.

habit zero #149

Lidor WyssockyHabit Zero

one thing I observed   Most of the time, you have to be in the right mindset to see things differently. Often, it happens entirely inside your head: you see something, and your brain interprets it as something different or adds layers on top of it. There are times, however, when someone has already done all the work for us, and we just need to sit back and enjoy it. And this fantastic car is a perfect example of that. No one can ignore it. You don’t have “to see things differently” to enjoy it, because someone already turned it into something extraordinary. So, let’s take a minute to appreciate it. Look at the car carefully. Let yourself drown in these beautiful pink hearts. But wait… there’s something else there… one thing I thought of   So someone did all the work for us… but surprises are everywhere. Someone might create a heart-full car, but have you noticed the graffiti on the wall behind it? It’s a perfect match in terms of subject colors, s well as colors, and that’s just an amazing coincidence. And even if it is not a coincidence, this relationship between the car and the wall … Read More

Be an Inspiration

Lidor WyssockyBlog

“The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Steven Spielberg When seempli was first launched, I had a mission: to help anyone on the planet realize their creative potential. It is not a trivial mission to achieve, but four years later, I know now more than ever before that it is achievable. I know that because everywhere I look, I see people with so much potential starting realize what … Read More