Make Every School Day Count

Lidor WyssockyBlog

When I was a kid, the first day of the school year was so exciting. Sure, there was nothing like the summer vacation, but the first day of school was all about expecting the unexpected. New teachers, new friends, old friends which might have changed — it was like a chance to start fresh all over again, even if objectively most of it remained the same. Soon after that, when the excitement faded away, it became mostly routine. Unless…, unless there was a teacher who knew how to keep us on the edge (in the best sense possible): to keep us in expectation mode — imagining what could happen next. Today, when two of my children are about to start another school year, my excitement is replaced with a wish.

Future-Ready Education

Lidor WyssockyBlog

It seemed like the reasonable thing to do at first: introducing more technology in schools. It was also pretty cool. A dedicated classroom equipped with personal computers was a natural decision — we want our children to be ready for the future, don’t we? Next came the iPads, or Chromebooks, or regular laptops. And along with them new initiatives promoting Ed-Tech showed up by Apple, and Google, and Microsoft. Schools don’t have plenty of resources, so they appreciate any help. And when it comes with the coolness factor, it’s even better.

Imagination On Hold

Lidor WyssockyBlog

If you have kids or if you are working with kids, chances are you intuitively know what Dr. George Land found in his research: we are all born creative. Imagination is not merely an ability we all have. As young children, imagination is an essential part of our lives. Imagination, combined with observation, is how we learn about the world, how we learn about ourselves, and the force that drives us forward. Most of us intuitively feel that as we grow up, imagination takes a smaller part in our daily routine. The research done by Dr. Land shows that while 98% of 5-year olds are creative, only 2%(!) of adults are. In the same spirit, most of the people I meet claim with complete confidence that they are “just not the creative type.” Does our imagination just fade away when we grow up? Is our creativity designed to start with a bang and quickly decline? And how come some people remain imaginative and creative in everything they do. A few days ago I chatted with a Dr. Gillian Judson who is working on bringing back imagination to the front of the education system. She claimed imagination does not fade away … Read More

seempli v2.5: Your Creativity Toolbox

Lidor WyssockyBlog

It’s springtime here in Israel, and this makes a perfect time to launch the latest updated of seempli. We took this opportunity to redesign the navigation in our platform around what you are aiming to achieve when you work with seempli. So, without further ado, this is seempli v2.5:

Summer Time

Lidor WyssockyBlog

If you ask me what is the one thing I remember from any of my summer vacations, it would be the anticipation. More than I remember the vacation itself, I remember the feeling of waiting for it. I can just feel the excitement as if something new and unknown was about to begin. For an external observer, most of the vacation days might have looked ordinary, or even boring. But for me, common as they might seem, they were a kind of an adventure. Anything could have happened. And some of it did.

The Future is in Your Hands

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Do you remember any of your school teachers? Do you remember the best teachers you had? What was it that made them better teachers and more memorable than others? Your best teachers were probably inspiring. Their teaching methods were probably creative, and at the same time, they encouraged you and your friends to be creative. Your best teachers were likely to urge you not only to get answers, but also to ask questions. They ignited what would best be described as “something else” in the classroom.

The Magic Button

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Imagine having a magic button in your brain. A button you can push to open your mind and effectively start learning and memorizing new things. Imagine you can do one simple thing before you go into class, or before you approach a new task at work, that will make you perform better (and enjoy it more as well). Now, stop imagining! Why? Because this magic button is already embedded in our brain. Curious?

Five Tips for Leading an Amazing Workshop

Lidor WyssockyBlog

The first time I stood in front of a room full of people doing a presentation I was terrified. There were a few dozens of people in the audience, most of whom I didn’t know. I knew what I wanted to say, the presentation was ready, and I even had some cool props. Still, I had in front of me a room full of people and I had to make them (and keep them) interested for the next sixty minutes. And it was not trivial. Years (and presentations) later – enough to make me believe I know what I’m doing, I found myself in front of a group of fifteen people, but this time not as a presenter. It was a workshop, and I had to drive the participants to immediate action. I had to make them get up from their chairs, take an active part in the activities, hopefully do them with real intent (otherwise they won’t work), and have fun during this process, not feeling they are forced to do something they didn’t feel comfortable with. It didn’t matter how well I knew the plan, and how well I could present the key points. I knew that if the participant … Read More

Be an Inspiration

Lidor WyssockyBlog

“The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.”                                                                                                                                               Steven Spielberg No matter how old you are, you probably remember at least two school teachers: the best teacher you had, and (obviously) the worst one. I remember my high school literature teacher. I don’t remember any concrete piece of literature she taught us. I don’t remember any poem or any type of rhyming. I also didn’t do that well in literature. I used to think of myself more as a person of numbers and logic, and less of that fluffy stuff anyone can interpret freely. And yet, I remember my literature teacher as the best teacher I had.