Space for Opportunities

Lidor WyssockyBlog

I’m a planner. For most of my life, I was. And by that, I don’t mean I necessarily have detailed long-term plans. But when it comes to projects or my daily agenda, my instinct was always to start with a plan. Whatever the project is, there is nothing that will make me happier than a blank piece of paper or an empty table — a space to write down what and when I need to do to realize the project. Then, of course, I might add interfaces, resources, and other things that the plan depends on. And just like magic, without anything changed in the real world, I feel there’s a much higher chance the project would reach its desired goal. This might all sound reasonable enough. What you need to know about me, though, is that under the label “Project,” I can easily host practically anything. From a one-week vacation abroad to a trip to Ikea, from packing my bag before I go to a photo-walk to finding the optimal bag to buy, from building a team to defining the work-plan for the upcoming year. My default mindset in any of those is: the better the plan — the … Read More

Getting Things Done. Differently.

Lidor WyssockyBlog

In the past week I attended the Atlassian Summit in Barcelona. If you are not familiar with Atlassian, this is not the place for describing their amazing platform and tools. But this quote of their mission statement is a good introduction to the spirit of the company: “to help unleash the potential of every team through open work.” This post is not in any way a promotional post. I am not affiliated with Atlassian and I was an attendee like any other in the conference. But when I come across a creative way of doing something pretty trivial (might I say even boring), I’m turned on. So, here’s what turned me on this week.

Beware of What You Wish For

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Asking my children to do something about the mess in their rooms is pretty much a common ritual in our house. My wife and me find ourselves puzzled ever too often with the amount of stuff our children have managed to collect over the years and their unique approach toward dealing with it: leaving it where it was last used. Luckily, “where it was last used” is confined in most cases to their own rooms. So, the ritual start with a request, and then a protest, and then some nagging, and eventually (one day or one week later) they do us all the favor of realizing that cleaning up the mess will take them less effort than dealing with the infinite nagging. Eventually, their rooms look decent (read: you can actually see the floor or the desk). But to our unsurprising surprise, it takes less than a week for the exact same level of mess to reappear magically.

Crossing Boundaries

Lidor WyssockyBlog

Wherever we look there are borders and boundaries. They can be geometrical or political; ideological or physical; they can be real and tangible or imaginary; they can be boundaries between objects and spaces or between people. Not all boundaries are meant to be crossed, but crossing some of them is an opportunity to explore, imagine, and create. The Crossing Boundaries Seed is an invitation to look around you and find boundaries that can be crossed. Maybe you will be able to cross them, and maybe someone or something else has already done so. Whether it is a ray of light breaking through and unexpectedly illuminating a closed space, or someone making a great achievement, finding and capturing boundaries being crossed can be an inspiration for you to do the same.